singing

A Singer’s Face

By |2020-04-30T17:53:37-04:00November 21st, 2012|Acting, Blog Post, Singing, Stagecraft|

A singer's face is a map. When the audience closes its eyes, her face should burn through their eyelids. I love faces. All my life I've studied them. Staring is a tool of the trade. The face relays the health of the body and the soul. A doctor always knows when we have a fever, and an audience always [...]

Carriage and Silhouette

By |2020-04-30T17:56:00-04:00November 8th, 2012|Acting, Blog Post, Public Speaking, Singing, Stagecraft|

From her first appearance on stage, before an artist has done anything to prove her talent, her posture will inform the audience. Even the grandest of introductions from a master of ceremony will be compromised if she walks on slouching. The performance begins with the first part of her that enters - her big toe, her index finder, her [...]

The Breath

By |2020-04-30T17:59:14-04:00October 23rd, 2012|Blog Post, Singing, Stagecraft|

Singing is placing music on the breath. Breathing is a matter of never-ending visualization, exercise and practice. We practice by alternating between taking in air slowly and quickly, holding it as long as possible, and regulating its rapid or gradual release. Breathing should not draw attention to itself but be relaxed and effortless. Deep breathing is by nature relaxing [...]

Training

By |2020-05-02T19:28:50-04:00October 12th, 2012|Acting, Blog Post, Singing, Stagecraft|

A person wishing to become a chanteuse must study the voice. A chanteuse who both sings and speaks her songs is continually in danger of damaging or even losing her voice if it does not rest on a solid foundation of technical training. It is, however, possible to over-train the voice. The principle behind most vocal regimes is to identify [...]

The Life of Words

By |2020-05-06T20:10:28-04:00September 24th, 2012|Acting, Blog Post, Public Speaking, Singing, Stagecraft|

For me, singing and acting are minimally about technique and tone and fundamentally about words and feeling. Before I take on a new work, I have to accept what the text and the tune propose, and to accept the proposal, I must have an unconditionally strong feeling for it. Words are the means through which that feeling is expressed. [...]